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Healing Crisis When Detoxifying

“Every time I start a detox I feel awful and then give up. All of these foods that supposedly make me feel better actually make me feel worse. What gives?” You might not want to hear this, but initially feeling bad is a good thing. When you eliminate inflammatory, processed foods and stop feeding your body garbage and chemicals, your body goes through withdrawal just like with drugs or alcohol. It is good because it means you are on your way to getting clean! I call this a healing crisis or a detox crisis. Trust me: This process is well worth it because it Read More...

Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkins and pumpkin seeds belong to the same family as cantaloupe, watermelon, cucumber, and squash. Long valued as a great source of zinc, pumpkin seeds are becoming increasingly recognized for being rich in antioxidants. Before processing pumpkins for meals, desserts or decorating, remember to retain the seeds. Nutrients & Vitamins Pumpkin seeds are a great source of nutrition, providing all the nutrients such as manganese, magnesium, iron, copper, tryptophan, zinc, phosphorus, and many other minerals and vitamins. Tryptophan – an essential amino acid in protein Composition tryptophan in pumpkin seeds helps fight depression. Once in the body, tryptophan is converted into serotonin and niacin are helpful hormone, Read More...

Understanding Seasonal Blues

Exposure to light naturally increases feel good chemicals in our brains and bodies, such as serotonin. When the days shorten in the fall and you have less exposure to sun and natural light, you have a physiological setup for feeling a bit blue or moody. This seasonal change isn’t in your imagination—seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is real and affects tens of thousands of people (maybe more) each year. As the summer ends, it’s not uncommon to experience fatigue, lethargy, weight gain, carbohydrate craving, excessive sadness, and changes in your libido. Luckily there are some easy things you can do to Read More...

8 Ways to Reduce Cortisol Naturally

What is cortisol? Cortisol is the primary stress hormone secreted by the 2 cap-sized glands that are located on top of your kidneys in response to stress. It has been described as a low-grade adrenaline. This hormone assists in “fight-or-flight” situations. Its job is to quickly convert stored energy sources in the body into usable energy. Today, as a society, we are stressing over bills, going to work, relationships, poor food choices, dehydration, overtraining with exercise, lack of adequate sleep, among others. Every time the body becomes stressed, cortisol is released. This chronic elevation in cortisol is extremely detrimental to a person’s Read More...

B Vitamins: What They Are and Why You Need Them

The B-complex vitamins all play an important role in energy production and aid enzymatic reactions necessary for the metabolism of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Without B vitamins, many of our bodily processes would shut down and we wouldn’t be able to function properly. In total, there are 8 B-Vitamins. Here are the roles of each, and why they are so important: Vitamin B1 (thiamine) Food Sources: sunflower seeds, navy beans, black beans, barley, dried peas, green peas, lentils, pinto beans, lima beans, oats Vitamin B1 aids regulation of our appetite and boosts energy. It also plays a key role in maintaining the Read More...

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot, a skin disease caused by a fungus, can leave your feet burning. And itching. And cracking. And blistering. Do nothing and you can expect chronic discomfort. Spend just a little time and you can expect relief. Slip on a pair of flip-flops. It only takes a few seconds to put them on and you’ll have more protection, especially in high foot-traffic areas such as locker and shower rooms in health clubs. Dry between your toes. Take a moment to thoroughly dry between the toes after bathing. Drying is important because athlete’s foot usually gains its toehold (literally) on the skin between Read More...

13 Symptoms of Chronic Dehydration

When you’re dehydrated, you’re more prone to irritability and fatigue. Your cognitive functions, including your ability to concentrate also take a hit. Your body is comprised of about 65 percent water, which is needed for a number of physiological processes and biochemical reactions, including but not limited to: Blood circulation Metabolism Regulation of body temperature Waste removal and detoxification It’s important to recognize that your body loses water throughout each day, even when you’re not sweating, and that you need to constantly replenish this fluid loss. We lose water routinely when we: Breathe- humidified air leaves the body. (The breath you see in the air Read More...